Blog

UPDATE: According to this New York Times story on Zappos, the online merchant says in a post that the hack disclosed all the personal information in customer online accounts or records -- name, address, phone number, password, email address, etc -- including the last four digits of their credit card numbers. Consumers should be aware that this kind of breach often leads to a followup attack where the bad guys contact you again and purport to be security staff for your bank. They offer the partial information that they have as proof, and then ask you to confirm that you really are that consumer by matching the "rest of your credit card number so we can be sure it really is you. Here's our website form to fill in." Doh! Believe it or not, Homer Simpson is not the only consumer who would fall for that. Remember, don't reply to "phishing" emails-- call the number on your credit or debit card to speak with your bank if you are not sure an inquiry by phone or email is real.

ORIGINAL POST: Over at his Red Tape Chronicles, MS-NBC's Bob Sullivan warns that Internet marketer "Zappos says hacker may have accessed info on 24 million customers."

For tips on fighting back against identity theft, check out the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.

Meanwhile, the New York Times has an interesting story, "Online Shoppers Are Rooting for the Little Guy," by Stephanie Clifford and Claire Cain Miller about how some online shoppers are trying to buy from little guys, not the Zappos or Amazons, because big Internet retailers are crushing the little e-tailers, just like big box stores crush local stores. Unfortunately, while a strategy described in the story, "Buy It Where You Try It," sounded good, I didn't find much evidence of it spreading on the web.

Author/policy analyst Stacy Mitchell of The New Rules Project of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance has regular updates and reports on the impact of big stores on local economies and even on their effect on the quality of the stuff you buy, as her recent post "Is your stuff falling apart? Thank Walmart" explains.

Priority Action

The overuse of antibiotics on factory farms is threatening the effectiveness of lifesaving antibiotics. Call on the Obama Administration to put an end to the worst practices.

Support Us

Your donation supports Florida PIRG’s work to stand up for consumers on the issues that matter, especially when powerful interests are blocking progress.

Consumer Alerts

Join our network and stay up-to-date on our campaigns, get important consumer updates and take action on critical issues.
Optional Member Code